BOOKISH FINDS: Literary Things

DSC_1077

DSC_1127 (2)

I was doing so well, really well actually. I almost got the number of books I had bought but hadn’t read under a two digit figure (not including the library books I loaned) and I went and ruined it all with a trip to my trusty local Oxfam shop. The best (and the worst) thing about going to charity shops is that you end up finding things you hadn’t known you wanted. It’s a great way to discover a new book or author. Maybe thats why I find it physically impossible to stop myself from stepping inside once I’m on the right street. Here are my buys:

  • Brokeback Mountain by Annie Proulx
  • Going the Distance edited by Alan Beard
  • Blaming by Elizabeth Taylor
  • The Oxford Book of Short Stories by V. S. Pritchett
  • How to be a Dragonfly by Patricia Debney
  • The Floating Man by Katherine Towers

Continue reading “BOOKISH FINDS: Literary Things”

BOOKISH FINDS: Library Loans

DSC_1077DSC_1123 (2)

I seem to be unstoppable when it comes to buying books recently, which I don’t regret at all, but my university has an impressive library and it seems like a wasted opportunity if I don’t at least take out a few books. As I mentioned in earlier posts, I am an aspiring short story writer. I’m also trying to write poetry. The verdict’s out on that one for now. So I went on a spree and reserved these books, which I was loaned until Febuary 24th. I may have been too enthusiastic, but luckily I can extend the loan for as long as I want. Hurrah!

Here’s what I borrowed:

  1. Dear Life by Alice Munro
  2. The Collected Stories by Katherine Mansfield
  3. Brief Interviews with Hideous Men by David Foster Wallace
  4. Saints & Sinners by Edna O’Brien
  5. Poetry in the Making by Ted Hughes

Continue reading “BOOKISH FINDS: Library Loans”

BOOKISH FINDS: Blood Work and Rupture

DSC_1077DSC_1111 (2).JPG

Poetry, I’m afraid to say, is a writing form I’ve disregarded in the last few years. Part of it is down to the way it was taught in school, but largely it’s to do with the fact that I’ve prejudged poetry based on my own cringe-worthy attempts as a teenager. Luckily they are all buried in the abyss known as ‘Documents’, and I’ve come to realise that just because I read two or three drab poems in a classroom, and wrote a hundred more angst-ridden ones in my bedroom, doesn’t mean that all poetry is the same. It’s like saying every novel is the same. It’s ridiculous.

I’ve been introducing myself gently through poetry events at The Bluecoat, which I didn’t just tolerate, I enjoyed. I bought the books to prove it.

Continue reading “BOOKISH FINDS: Blood Work and Rupture”

BOOKISH FINDS: Austen Re-imagined

DSC_1077DSC_1095 (2)

Sense & Sensibility by Joanna Trollope

I almost made it out of Oxfam with my pennies intact, but decided to have a quick browse of the classics section, and maybe tempt myself by looking at the lovely E.M. Forster books if they were still there, only to have the bright blue cover of Joanna Trollop’s Sense & Sensibility catch my eye. I sighed, picked up the book, and headed straight for the counter before anyone else could get their hands on it.

Continue reading “BOOKISH FINDS: Austen Re-imagined”

BOOKISH FINDS: Charity Shop Treasures

DSC_1077

DSC_1058

Sometimes the best books are the ones that sneak up on you. I haven’t been into any charity shops in a while but, as my bookish desires were growing stronger, I decided to pop into a couple whiles I was milling around town. The Oxfam on Bold Street in Liverpool has a really great selection of books helpfully arranged by genre and a great selection of vintage clothing and records to. It’s definitely worth a visit if you’re ever around the area. I almost bought a beautiful copy of Maurice and Howards End by E. M. Forster, but there are only so many books you can carry. Here’s what I did pick up:

  1. A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby
  2. 31 Songs by Nick Hornby
  3. Selected Poems by Sylvia Plath
  4. The Giver by Lois Lowry

Continue reading “BOOKISH FINDS: Charity Shop Treasures”

BOOKISH FINDS

DSC_1077DSC_1063I have a terrible habit of going into supermarkets to buy mundane items and coming out with things that I hadn’t intended on buying. This is a big issue in Asda, because they have a deal on their books and quite a few of them are surprisingly good. On this occassion I went to buy a fineliner and some fruit and came out with:

  1. The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson
  2. In a Dark Dark wood by Ruth Ware
  3. Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

Continue reading “BOOKISH FINDS”