READING LISTS: Siblings in Fiction

EtheringtonHeaders-Reading ListsI read to books last week and coincidentally both had sibling relationships at their centre, and they were positive relationships. They supported each other, protected each other and made each other laugh. They were brother and sister, or sister and sister, or brother and brother, but they were also friends. That’s not to say their relationships were perfect. Siblings can be your closest allies and an acute pain in the bum. The problem is they know how to push your buttons, they know things your parents don’t about you and that gives them leverage, and they don’t always agree with you. As one of three children, I can confirm all this is true, but that’s what’s great about siblings. Even when they annoy you and tease you, they’ll still stick up for you when it counts. Continue reading “READING LISTS: Siblings in Fiction”

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REVIEW: Call Me By Your Name by Andre Aciman

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There’s something about teenage infatuation. The sweaty palms, the racing heart, the constant mantra ‘do they really like me’? When you have a crush as a teenager your imagination runs wild and the possibilities seem endless. You project your feelings onto the actions of the person you like, imagine that a look or touch or conversation are significant, signs that they feel the same. Some of that excitement carries through into your adult life, but it’s not as all encompassing. Andre Aciman’s Call Me By Your Name is a tender and evocative exploration of one boy’s infatuation and the tentative relationship that grows from it. Continue reading “REVIEW: Call Me By Your Name by Andre Aciman”

MISC: Films I wish were books

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If you haven’t watched God’s Own Country yet then I highly recommend that you do. Seriously, I will lend you my copy on DVD if I have to. It’s a significant film personally for me because it’s the first I watched on my own in the cinema. Admittedly, I did bump into someone I knew there, but I still sat on my lonesome and as the lights went down I was glad, because it’s a film you don’t want to be distracted from. You might think you’ve been transported to the world of the Brontes as soon as the brooding scenery and howling winds fill the screen, but this is an entirely modern story of romance and redemption. Continue reading “MISC: Films I wish were books”

REVIEW: Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

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Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi is a novel, but it could just as easily be described as an interlinked short story collection, following the very different fates of two sisters and their subsequent decendants. Effia and Esi share a mother but spend their lives apart, living in separate villages. The distance between them stretches wider when Effia is married off to an English soldier and Esi is captured and sold into slavery. Neither have a choice in their futures. Continue reading “REVIEW: Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi”

DOWN THE TBR HOLE #17

EtheringtonHeaders-Down the TBRIt’s been a while since I tried to get control of my Goodreads TBR list. If anything, my physical pile has been getting more out of hand. I may actually have to try and restrain myself over the next few months. Like actually do it this time.

Lia at Lost In A Story started this weekly post to trim down the Goodreads to-read list.

The rules are simple:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if youre feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Continue reading “DOWN THE TBR HOLE #17”

REVIEWS: I Am, I Am, I Am by Maggie O’Farrell

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Never has the past been more present that in Maggie O’Farrell’s captivating memoir I Am, I Am, I Am. Time can erase the sense of immediacy, but from the opening I was engrossed, more than that. I felt a jolt of fear, I was apprehensive, and for a brief second I forgot that I was reading a memoir. Surely that first encounter with death was more at home in a thriller, or the opening of a dark crime novel, surely that sort of thing didn’t happen in real life. It’s not a spoiler to say that O’Farrell survives the ordeal, and the next and the next, but for that fraction of a second I wondered whether she would. Continue reading “REVIEWS: I Am, I Am, I Am by Maggie O’Farrell”

MISC: Guess who’s back?

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I may have taken an impromptu hiatus from the blog over the last few weeks. Sorry guys. It turns out that preparing for London Book Fair takes up more time and energy than this naive little intern thought. I enjoyed every minute of it, but alas the book fair is over and now I can turn back to the wondrous world of book-blogging. I’m excited to get back into the game and catch up with everything I’ve missed!