BOOKISH FINDS: Library Loans

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I seem to be unstoppable when it comes to buying books recently, which I don’t regret at all, but my university has an impressive library and it seems like a wasted opportunity if I don’t at least take out a few books. As I mentioned in earlier posts, I am an aspiring short story writer. I’m also trying to write poetry. The verdict’s out on that one for now. So I went on a spree and reserved these books, which I was loaned until Febuary 24th. I may have been too enthusiastic, but luckily I can extend the loan for as long as I want. Hurrah!

Here’s what I borrowed:

  1. Dear Life by Alice Munro
  2. The Collected Stories by Katherine Mansfield
  3. Brief Interviews with Hideous Men by David Foster Wallace
  4. Saints & Sinners by Edna O’Brien
  5. Poetry in the Making by Ted Hughes

Dear Life by Alice Munro

The name Alice Munro seems to crop up in most conversations around short story writing, which is naturally understandable as she is one of the most influential short story writer’s alive. I’ve wanted to read her works for some time and I’m excited to dip into Dear Life. It also has a beautiful cover which, no matter what anyone says, is always a bonus.

The Collected Stories by Katherine Mansfield

I read Katherine Mansfield’s short story A Cup of Tea during one of my seminar’s last term and completely fell in love with the humour in her prose. Her narrative voice is flawless. I have to read more.

Brief Interviews with Hideous Men by David Foster Wallace

I’ve already read a couple of the stories at the start of this collection and I have to say, the diversity and the eloquence with which David Foster Wallace write is breath-taking. The imagery he uses in Forever Overhead elevates a boy’s attempt to jump off a diving board into a coming of age epic.

Saints & Sinners by Edna O’Brien

This is slightly cheating because I’ve just finished reading it and have a review of it coming up but I absolutely loved this collection. Irish short story writers have a way of sneaking into my heart. Absolutely brilliant.

Poetry in the Making by Ted Hughes

I opened this book after taking it out on loan to discover that its actually targeted to teachers of children age 11-14. Undeterred (because I am clueless when it comes to poetry and because Ted Hughes is a poetic great) I nosed my way through the first chapter. I have to say, regardless of age, its a book accessible to everyone and there were some really great points on how to start writing poetry. I’m eager to finish it.

 

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Author: Nicole @whatadifferenceawordmakes

Book-lover, tea enthusiast and MA student

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